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Joaquin Remora moved to California with $1,000 in his pocket, no job and two back-to-back evictions under his belt. The move was a lifesaver.

“I was like, ‘I’m either going to come out as transgender, or kill myself,’” he said. “San Francisco was the only place that I could think of where I thought it wasn’t going to be a problem for me to be trans.”

For the first few months after he arrived, Remora lived in his car. “I didn’t access housing services because it was too overwhelming,” he said. “I was traumatized, I didn’t feel like I was deserving of them.”

On March 9, the city’s first navigation center to specifically serve transgender and gender-nonconforming people opens in SoMa. Operated by St. James Infirmary, a nonprofit that serves sex workers, the 65-bed shelter (81 after COVID-19 restrictions end) will provide case management, health care, job opportunities and substance use treatment for people experiencing homelessness.

“We know that queer people in general, and trans and gender nonconforming people specifically, are overrepresented in the homelessness system,” Shireen McSpadden, director of the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing, told the Public Press after meeting with staff and touring the site. “I think that this is the right response.”

It will fill a gap in homeless services that has excluded a highly vulnerable population. Transgender people are 17 times more likely to experience homelessness than the average person, and 70% of those who have stayed in shelters report having experienced harassment, according to a study conducted by the National Center for Transgender Equality. As a result, unhoused transgender people are often reluctant to engage in traditional services.

San Francisco is no exception. A lack of culturally competent shelter staff is something Remora, who eventually got housing and a job with a homelessness nonprofit, witnessed firsthand.

Early in the pandemic, he worked at two navigation centers in the city, where he says he saw staff struggle to address the intersections of violence, sex work and gender identity. The idea for a navigation center that serves only transgender and gender non-conforming people emerged late one night, while Remora worked an overnight shift at the Embarcadero Navigation Center with one of the few gender-nonconforming staff members, Britt Creech.

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“We just started talking about this dream we had,” Creech said. “This is the most marginalized community that we see. They’ve been let down over and over and over again.”

Several months later, an opportunity to open the center appeared. The Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing reached out to the Transgender Gender-Variant and Intersex Justice Project, a prison abolition organization, to see if they’d be interested in taking over the Bryant Street Navigation Center, which had been converted to an isolation ward during the pandemic. The organization suggested the city reach out to St. James Infirmary, where Remora was working as the inaugural director of a new city initiative called Our Trans Home SF. All of a sudden, he had a path forward to creating a new type of homeless shelter for transgender people.

Creech came on board as managing site director. Together, they decided to christen the new space the Taimon Booton Navigation Center, in honor of an unhoused gender-nonconforming youth who made a significant impact on them both before dying in 2020.

The navigation center, located under Interstate 80, is one of the few not built in a large white tent. Instead, it has orange and blue walls and a large tree emerging from its patio. Its planters, currently containing struggling greenery, will soon be filled with succulents; Creech has a green thumb. There are plans for murals honoring local trans activists and fairy lights to illuminate the outdoor areas after dark. Gendered signs outside the bathrooms and showers will be removed.

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St. James Infirmary’s commitment to hiring employees with lived experience of its clients has continued at the navigation center. Remora recruited staff using solely Instagram posts and word of mouth, hoping to build a racially diverse team of transgender and gender-nonconforming staff. The response was enormous.

“I interviewed 60-something people in five weeks,” he said. “The numbers showed when we started the interview process — and everyone else was having a hard time hiring — how many trans people are not applying to regular jobs, because they know that it’s not sustainable for them or healthy. This is a really big opportunity to work somewhere you can be yourself.”

The commitment to a peer-based model of services is something McSpadden applauds. “I think this can be transformational for people,” she said. “It’s healing. It’s safe. It builds community. That, to me, is really exciting.”

That healing is central to St. James’ mission for the space. Stephany Ashley, St. James’ former executive director, consulted on the opening of the center. “Trans people, and especially trans feminine people, experience so much violence on a daily basis,” she said. “It’s one thing to have a home to go to at the end of the day, and a door to close, that’s your safe space. But for people who are unhoused, there’s never that moment where you’re not subjected to that violence. This place is really going to be a refuge. That’s what’s been missing from the system of care.”

With just a few days to go until the navigation center opens, St. James’ staffers are busy alerting nonprofits, frontline workers and case managers — who already have relationships with transgender people experiencing homelessness — about its presence. A guest list is starting to form, though the plan is to bring in residents slowly.

“People are traumatized, and if they don’t have a space where they can start the day with some peace, then they’re always going to stay in trauma,” Creech said. “We have people in place to help guide them and open those doors. So maybe we start with a little bit of care, get people to open up, then the world’s their oyster.”

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Community Support Line for Sex Workers Seeks Volunteers

SWOP Behind Bars is seeking volunteers for their Community Support Line especially for people located on the West-coast.

If you are a sex worker in need of support check out the link for online chat functions or

call 1-877-776-2004 ext. 1

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Amanda Priebe art for St. James_ Color_ with flowers _1_

artwork by Amanda Priebe

DEAR SEX WORKERS: WE LOVE YOU

Online Workshop Series Continues

Mindfulness and Meditation with Vadan is every Monday at 12noon

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What We Believe

There are many factors which affect the working conditions and experiences for all Sex Workers including the political and economic climate, poverty and homelessness, stigmatization, violence, as well as the overwhelming intricacies of the legal, public and social systems. It is the philosophy of St. James Infirmary to build upon existing skills and strengths in order to allow individuals to determine their own goals.

  • We are fundamentally against the criminalizing of Sex Workers—regardless of our different perspectives on decriminalization or legalization, the collective view of the St. James Infirmary is that incarceration of our community further marginalizes and disenfranchised us, which creates barriers to capacity building, and exacerbates a public health crisis.
  • We believe in revolution through healthcare. We challenge the conventional healthcare model that divides patients and providers and fosters unhealthy power dynamics. Our peer-based model creates a safe, trusted, and honest environment in which to provide services, and empowers our community to define our own well-being.
  • We are founded on the principles of harm reduction—St. James Infirmary supports Sex Workers being treated with dignity and respect, in every aspect of their lives

Our Impact

  • We increase access to primary healthcare and social services for Sex Workers throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.
  • We formalize communication and collaboration among individuals and agencies who serve Sex Workers to better serve our community.
  • We promote peer-based public health initiatives on behalf of Sex Workers, which may be used as a model for improving occupational health and safety standards and developing comprehensive medical and social services for Sex Workers around the world.
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From Our Blog

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A Folsom twist on Twister

By sjidirector | October 12, 2009

B.ay A.rea R.eporter October 1, 2009 “Race Cooper plants his tongue on Tony Aziz’s nipple during a game of “Nearly Naked Twister” at the Folsom Street Fair Sunday, September 27. Warm weather brought out throngs of people to the leather and fetish extravaganza. The popular Twister game (with a kinkier twist) was a benefit for […]

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Taking the Pledge

By sjidirector | October 7, 2009

Taking the Pledge is a 13-minute film featuring sex workers from Bangladesh, Brazil, Cambodia, Mali, Thailand and more! They describe the problems created by the ‘anti-prostitution pledge’ required to receive USAID and PEPFAR funds. In English, Khmer, Thai, French, Portuguese and Bengali, with English subtitles. Watch in full-screen mode to read the subtitles. Produced by […]

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From our friends at the Desiree Alliance: Las Vegas, 2010

By sjidirector | September 30, 2009

The Desiree Alliance is pleased to announce that our upcoming National Sex Worker Conference will be in sunny Las Vegas, Nevada, July 25th – 30th, 2010. The process for choosing Las Vegas as our next conference site was a lengthy one, that first involved a broadly distributed community survey that revealed the top three location sites […]

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Folsom Street: Hot & Heavy 4 Volunteers

By sjidirector | August 27, 2009

This year St. James Infirmary is partnering as a major beneficiary of the Folsom Street Fair Events and will receive a grant of $8,000 grant. This money will be used to help with vital clinic services during so many City & State budget cuts. We are looking for people to help out St. James Infirmary […]

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Stop, Look, Listen-GAATW Petition-Recognise Rights

By sjidirector | August 17, 2009

Re-posted from Sex Workers Outreach Project Dear Friends, There is debate within the movement about how to address the numerous injustices that we see, committed against sex workers in the name of combating trafficking. GAATW has always supported decriminalization of prostitutioni, and their anti-trafficking work is informed by sex worker rights issues. This petition represents […]

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Hos, Hookers, Call Girls & Rent Boys

By sjidirector | July 30, 2009

If you missed the readings of this book last week at Center for Sex and Culture, or  at A Different Light, you can still catch one on Tuesday, August 4th at 7pm at Modern Times –888 Valencia St San Francisco. Join Dr. Carol Queen, Lorelei Lee, Al Eros, Lilycat, Diana Morgaine, RJ Martin, David Henry […]

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AIDS Walk 2009, Hos of Harm Reduction

By sjidirector | July 18, 2009

Tomorrow, St. James Infirmary staff will be strutting their stuff in Golden Gate Park for the SF AIDS Walk. Our team, the Hos of Harm Reduction, is still accepting donations.  By contributing to our AIDS Walk efforts you will be supporting important life saving HIV/AIDS work as well as the St. James Infirmary. If you […]

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NEW REDUCED SERVICES

By sjidirector | June 30, 2009

So this is not good news, but because of the budget cuts in the last 6 months, and a reduction in our grants and donations we are making some more changes to our services. Beginning July 14th we are reducing our Tuesday services as follows: NEX hours are now from 3-6pm, we will no longer […]

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Budget Cuts-Hit the Infirmary HARD!

By sjidirector | June 18, 2009

In November, the City of San Francisco and the California State Office of AIDS told us they would be cutting our contract funding due to the current economy.  With these 2 contracts we lost over $125,000 in funding.  Additionally, as most Foundations have endowments that are market driven, foundation giving is shriveling up.  Lastly, individual […]

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10 years, 700 guests, & $15,700–Cirque X, simply spectacular! Much love & gratitude!

By sjidirector | June 7, 2009

To all the Volunteers & Performers- Well the event last night was so amazingly hot!! We sizzled at the door too.  Everyone who came out made the night so much fun and a very successful fundraiser.  As we just celebrated our 10th Year (can you believe that?), we are blessed to have so many amazing […]

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